Constantin Christopoulos

Kinetica, Technical Advisor | Toronto, Canada

About

Dr. Constantin Christopoulos is an expert in seismic isolation and supplemental damping devices and led the development of the Viscoelastic Coupling Damper (VCD) as a Professor of Civil Engineering and the Director of Structures Laboratories at the University of Toronto. He is also the holder of the Canada Research Chair in Seismic Resilience of Infrastructure. He is the author of more than 100 technical papers, two major textbooks, and the co-inventor on several international patents. He has served as a technical advisor to Kinetica on numerous high-profile building structures looking to implement the VCD for improved seismic and wind performance.

CTBUH Roles

Annual Conference, Presenter (Shanghai 2012; Chicago 2019)

Annual Conference, Session Chair (Shanghai 2014)

Innovation Conference, Speaker (Shenzhen 2019)

Research

29 June 2021

Applications of Solid Viscoelastic Coupling Dampers (VCDs)in Wind and Earthquake Sensitive Tall Buildings

Michael Montgomery, Kinetica; Luis Ardila & Constantin Christopoulos, University of Toronto

Solid Viscoelastic Coupling Dampers (VCDs) provide distributed damping that improves the dynamic performance of tall buildings for both wind-storms and earthquakes for all amplitudes of...

Login

You must be a CTBUH Member to view this resource.

View all

Research

16 September 2014

Design of a Slender Building with High-Performing VE Dampers

Michael Montgomery, Kinetica; Kevin MacLean & Tibor Kokai, Read Jones Christoffersen; Constantin Christopoulos, University of Toronto

A slender tower in downtown Toronto was identified early on in the design process as having wind dynamic motion issues and additional structural damping was...

Login

You must be a CTBUH Member to view this resource.

View all

Research

19 September 2012

Novel Coupling Damper System for Enhanced Performance of Tall Buildings

Constantin Christopoulos, University of Toronto; Michael Montgomery, Kinetica Dynamics

As high-rise buildings become taller and more slender, dynamic behavior becomes a critical design consideration. Wind loads cause large vibrations which can be perceived by...

Login

You must be a CTBUH Member to view this resource.

View all