Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
 

Climate, Culture, Context
2012, University of Nottingham, David Nicholson-Cole & Philip Oldfield

The third incarnation of this studio, run annually at the University of Nottingham, explores how tall buildings can relate better to their climate, culture and context.

Despite the recent boom in tall building construction, technological developments and attention from celebrated international architects, too many tall buildings fail to respond to their surroundings, often being merely designed as gleaming air-conditioned glass boxes, with little consideration of site and environment. The spectacle of such towers rising in very hot and very cold climates has led many to believe that the tall building is an unsustainable typology, unworthy of a role in our future cities.

This studio aims to challenge the above scenario, with students tasked to design a tall building on a site in one of three cities – Abu Dhabi, New York, or Singapore – and to take inspiration not only from the site’s context and climate, but also to explore if cultural, social and vernacular traditions can be reinterpreted into contemporary high-rise. The studio asks a number of questions of tall buildings – can they accommodate new and innovative functions? Can we create social / communal spaces at height within the city? Is there such a thing as a sustainable skyscraper?


Flood Plain Tower Vertical Oasis
Clarissa Wenborn and Aaron Marriott
 
The Vertical Oasis evolved from a consideration of water sustainability in the UAE. Water usage is among the highest in the world in the country – with average daily consumption at over 600 litres per person – and the lack of potable water and reliance on desalination makes water a vital element.
Flood Plain Tower Flood Plain Tower Flood Plain Tower Flood Plain Tower Flood Plain Tower Flood Plain Tower

Filtered Light Tower   Eco-Roofscraper
Pelin Gurkan and Jue Shi
 
This design takes on four agendas; water sustainability, solar protection, greenery and community. It consists of two towers – a slender residential tower and a shorter office building – both leaning out to create self-shading and reduce unwanted solar gain from the high Singaporean sun.
Filtered Light Tower Filtered Light Tower Filtered Light Tower Filtered Light Tower Filtered Light Tower Filtered Light Tower

Sikkas in the Sky
Alejandro Carrasco and Omelmominin Wadidy
 
This project takes inspiration from sustainable vernacular architectural elements in the Middle East. In particular, it was influenced by research on "Sikkas" – narrow alleys running between buildings, creating comfortable spaces which are shaded from the harsh desert sun and wind, and suitable for circulation and socio-communal activities.
Adaptable Tower Adaptable Tower Adaptable Tower Adaptable Tower Adaptable Tower Adaptable Tower

Stacked Courtyards   Vertical Aviary
Owen Rees-Jones, Nguyen Thi An, and Yiwei Ding
 
Rapid urbanisation in Singapore has had a dramatic effect on the country’s biodiversity, with estimates suggesting 95% of natural habitats have been lost over the past two centuries.
Stacked Courtyards Stacked Courtyards Stacked Courtyards Stacked Courtyards Stacked Courtyards Stacked Courtyards

Sky Forest Tower

Skygardens
Miao Yu, Jing Huang, and Chen Hu
 
This project is inspired by the physical and environmental context of Lower Manhattan, and in particular Battery Park, which sits directly to the south of the site. The design aims to extend and reflect the park vertically, resulting in a tall building where skygardens and vertical greenery are celebrated throughout.

Sky Forest Tower Sky Forest Tower Sky Forest Tower Sky Forest Tower Sky Forest Tower Sky Forest Tower

Green Roof City   Sky Terrene
Nirav Kandwala and Jin Huang
 
This project is concerned with permeability, natural ventilation and social sustainability in tropical high-rise. Inspired by Chinese Shop Houses in the adjacent Kampong Glam neighbourhood, the design aims to reinterpret the scale and community of this low-rise area into a high-rise building.
Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City

Green Roof City   Sportz'otel
Archana Vasudevan and Unnati Shah
 
The design solution is a series of stacked sports "villages" each located in a multi-storey structural box, supported by trusses spanning between the tower’s four cores. Each village is dedicated to a different sport – swimming, tennis, basketball and more, with a scuba tank at the ground floor interface / basement.
Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City Green Roof City