2017: Connecting the City: People, Density, and Infrastructure
6th Annual CTBUH International Student Design Competition
October 31, 2017
The winner and final rankings for the CTBUH International Student Design Competition, kindly sponsored by Woods Bagot, were determined at the 2017 CTBUH Conference in Australia. This year’s competition centered around the theme of designing tall buildings as a future-oriented urban response to the challenges of unprecedented population growth and mass urbanization.

1st Prize – Hong Kong: The City of Dual Perception by Dagmar Zvonickova of the University of Westminster.

First place was awarded to a project by Dagmar Zvonickova of the University of Westminster in the United Kingdom entitled “Hong Kong: The City of Dual Perception.”  This project aimed to address the lack of integration between the lively and vibrant streets of Hong Kong with the sterile lobbies of the city’s office buildings by designing a high-rise that features an art gallery at its base. Zvonickova received a $6,000 prize for her achievement.

Second place went to a project entitled “Producer: Self-Sustaining Skyscrapers” by Qiang Zhou and Minghao Liu of Inner Mongolia University of Technology in China. Their project would create self-sustaining skyscrapers to which the people of Tuvalu—a small Pacific island nation that is being engulfed by rising sea levels—could migrate, while also rejuvenating the shrinking coral reef ecosystems surrounding the islands. The second-place team received a $5,000 prize.

2nd Prize – Producer: Self-Sustaining Skyscrapers 3rd Prize – Networking Tradition and Future 4th Prize – London Rising 5th Prize – Horizon of Future Cities

Third place was awarded to a team from Xi’An Jiaotong Liverpool University in China, comprising Bissoonauth Chitraj and Tan Jingxiang. Their project, “Networking Tradition and Future,” designed a group of networked towers that established a variety of links and relationships with the surrounding urban context by means of functional programming in a mixed-use setting. A $4,000 prize was awarded to the third-place team.

Fourth place went to Daniel Ong of the University of Westminster in the United Kingdom for his project, “London Rising,” in which he designed a 304-meter tower for the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UNESCO) London Assembly Headquarters. A $3,000 prize was awarded for fourth place.

And finally, fifth place was awarded to “Horizon of Future Cities” by Shenglan Chen and Zihan Yang of Anhui Jianzhu University in China. Their project sought to remedy the lack of natural open spaces in urban areas by creating a multi-layered, multi-use parkland surrounded by a complex containing apartments, retail, museums, libraries and other civic functions. A $3,000 prize was awarded to the fifth-place team.

Dagmar Zvonickova (right) receiving the first-place prize from Domenic Alvaro, Director, Woods Bagot (left).
Jurists and other finalists react to Producer: Self-Sustaining Skyscrapers, which came in second place.
After the first-round jury whittled down the pool of semi-finalists, the five finalists were selected to attend the Sydney portion of the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference, where they presented their projects to the second-round jury.
Student Competition Jury listening to finalist presentations (left to right): Ron Klemencic, Chairman and CEO, Magnusson Klemencic Associates; Michele Pasca di Magliano, Associate Director, Zaha Hadid Architects; James Parakh, Urban Design Manager, City of Toronto Planning Department; Swinal Samant, Senior Lecturer, National University of Singapore; Domenic Alvaro, Director, Woods Bagot.
This year’s jury was chaired by Domenic Alvaro, Director, Woods Bagot, and comprised Ron Klemencic, Chairman and CEO, Magnusson Klemencic Associates; James Parakh, Urban Design Manager, City of Toronto Planning Department; Michele Pasca di Magliano, Associate Director, Zaha Hadid Architects; and Swinal Samant, Senior Lecturer, National University of Singapore.